Top Tools every Software Developer should know in 2022

With the increase in popularity of software development in the market, the adoption of its tools has also increased. Now, programmers prefer to use the right software developer tool while creating a solution for the client as it makes their lives easier. Besides, the right set of tools can help in getting the maximum output each day. But this choice might be difficult because of the huge number of software development tools available in the market. So, to make this choice easy for you, here, in this blog, we’ll go through a list of top software development tools in 2022 that can be used to boost the professional performance of the software development team.

What is Software Development?

Software development is a simple process that every software programmer uses to create computer programs. The entire process of developing a system for any business organization is known as Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC). This process includes various phases that offer a perfect method for creating products that meet both user requirements and technical specifications. For this, web developers use different types of development tools and the use of the right tool can help in streamlining the entire software development process.

Why Use Software Development Tools?

Developers use software tools to investigate and complete the business processes, optimize them, and document the software development processes. With the use of such tools, the software developers can create a project whose outcome can be more productive. Using the development tools, a software developer can manage the workflow easily.

15 Best Software Development Tools

Some of the top software programming tools every developer can use are:

UltraEdit

UltraEdit is one of the best tools when it comes to creating software with proper security, flexibility, and performance. It comes with an all-access package that offers the developers access to various tools like an integrated FTP client, a file finder, and a Git integration solution. It is a very powerful text editor that has the capabilities to handle large files with a breeze.

Key Features:

It can handle and load large files with proper performance, file load, and startup.
Supports complete OS integration like shell extensions and command lines.
You can configure, customize, and reskin the entire application with the help of beautiful themes.
Accesses the server and opens files with SFTP browser/ Native FTP. 
Helps in finding, comparing, and replacing inside files at blazing speed.
Spots visual differences between codes easily.
The all-access package of UltraEdit comes at $99.95 per year.

Atom

Atom is a top integrated development environment (IDE). And it’s open-source nature makes it run on the majority of the popular operating systems. It is a software development tool that is known for its rich level of customization and vast list of third-party integrations. Atom’s attribute, Autocomplete enables the developers to write the code easily and quickly. Besides this, the browser function of this tool simplifies project file management and this is possible because of its interface that comes with numerous panes to compare, view, edit, and compare files, all at once. Basically, Atom is the best option for developers because it can support every popular framework and programming language.

Key Features:

Atom supports cross-platform editing, this means that it can work for different types of operating systems like OS X, Windows, and Linux.
It uses the Electron framework for offering amazing web technologies. 
It is a customizable tool that comes with effective features for a better look and feel. 
Some of the important features of Atom like smart autocomplete, built-in package manager, multiple panes, find & replace feature, file system browser, etc.

Quixy

Quixy is used by enterprises for its cloud-based no-code platform approach. This tool helps businesses automate their workflows and create all types of enterprise-grade applications. Besides, it helps in eliminating the manual processes and turning different ideas into apps to make businesses transparent, productive, and innovative. 

Key Features:

Quixy helps in creating an app interface as per the client’s requirement by easily dragging and dropping 40+ form fields. 
It seamlessly integrates the third-party app with the help of ready-to-use Webhooks, connectors, and API integrations. 
It can model any process and create simple complex workflows. 
It helps in deploying applications with a single click and making changes anytime. 
Quixy also enables the developers to use it on any browser and device even in offline mode.
Offers live actionable dashboards and reports with the idea of exporting data in various formats.

Linx

Linx helps in creating and automating backend apps with a low-coding approach. This tool has the capability to accelerate the design, automation, and development of custom business processes. It offers services for easily integrating systems, apps, and databases. 

Key Features:

Drag and drop, easy-to-use IDE and Server.
It offers live debugging with the use of step-through logic.
Offers 100 pre-built plugins for rapid development.
It automates processes with the help of directory events and timers.

GitHub

GitHub is one of the most popular software development and collaboration tool for code management and review. It enables its users to create software and apps, host the code, manage the projects, and review the code. 

Key Features:

With the help of GitHub, web app developers can easily document their source code.
Some of the features of GitHub like access control and code security make it a more useful tool for all the team members. 
GitHub’s project management tools enable app developers to coordinate tasks easily.
This tool can be hosted on servers & cloud platforms and can run on operating systems like Mac and Windows. 

Embold

Embold is one of the most popular tools when it comes to fixing bugs before deployment. It helps in saving a lot of energy and time in the long run. It is a software analytics platform that helps the developers to analyze the source code and uncovers problems that might impact robustness, stability, security, and maintainability.

Key Features:

Embold offers plugins that can help in picking up code vulnerabilities.
It helps in integrating the system seamlessly with Bitbucket, GitHub, and Git. 
Embold comes with unique anti-pattern detection that helps in preventing the compounding of unmaintainable code.
With Emhold, it is possible to get faster and deeper checks for more than 10 languages.

Zoho Creator

Zoho Creator, a low-code software development tool enables rapid development and deployment of web applications and assists to create powerful enterprise software apps. Besides, it doesn’t require endless lines of code for creating an app. It comes with different features like JavaScript, Artificial Intelligence, Cloud functions, and more. There are more than 4 million users of this tool all over the world and they use it to enhance the productivity of their business.

Key Features:

Zoho Creator enables the creation of more apps with less effort.
It offers excellent security measures.
Creates insightful reports.
Helps in connecting the business data to different teams. 

GeneXus

GeneXus is a software development tool that offers an intelligent platform for creating applications that enable the automatic development, and maintenance of systems. The applications created using GeneXus can be easily adapted to changes. Besides, it is used when the developer has to work with the newest programming languages.

Key Features:

GeneXus offers an AI-based automatic software approach.
It comes with the highest flexibility which means that it has the capability to support the largest number in the market. 
Multi-experience apps can be created using this tool.
It has the best app security module.
It offers business process management support.
With GeneXus, developers get the highest level of deployment flexibility.

NetBeans

NetBeans is a very popular open-source and free software development tool. It is written in Java. Developers use NetBeans to create mobile, web, and desktop applications. This tool uses languages like C / C++, JavaScript, PHP, Java, and more.

Key Features:

With the help of NetBeans, a cross-platform system, developers can create apps that can be used on all different platforms like Mac, Linux, Solaris, Windows, etc.
Java apps can be easily created and updated using NetBeans 8 IDE, the newer edition for code analyzing.
NetBeans is a tool that offers the best features like writing bug-free code, Smart Code Editing, quick user interface development, and an easy management process.
NetBeans allows for the creation of well-organized code that eventually helps the app development team to understand the code structure easily. 

Eclipse

Eclipse is another popular IDE that is majorly used by Java developers. This tool is used to create apps that are not only written in Java but also in programming languages like PHP, ABAP, C, C++, C#, etc.

Key Features:

Eclipse, an open-source tool, plays an important role in the development of new and innovative solutions. 
It is used by developers for creating desktop, web, and cloud IDEs. 
Eclipse Software Development Kit (SDK) is open-source which means that developers can use it freely for creating any type of application with the help of any programming language.
Eclipse helps in code completion, refactoring, syntax checking, error debugging, rich client platform, industrial level of development, and more.
Integrating Eclipse with other frameworks like JUnit and TestNG is very easy.

Bootstrap

Bootstrap is another open-source framework that is used by software development companies for creating responsive websites and mobile-first projects. For this tool, the developers can use technologies like HTML, CSS, and JS. It is widely used and is designed to make websites simpler. 

Key Features:

Bootstrap is a tool that offers built-in components that can be used in accumulating responsive websites.  by a smart drag and drop facility.
This open-source toolkit comes with various customization options.
It comes with some amazing features like a responsive grid system, pre-built components, plug-ins, sass variables & mixins, and more. 
With Bootstrap, the developers get a guarantee of consistency,
Bootstrap, a front-end web framework is used by developers for quick modeling of the ideas.

Cloud 9

Cloud 9 was introduced in the year 2010 Cloud 9. At that time, it was an open-source, cloud-based IDE that supported different programming languages like Perl, C, Python, PHP, JavaScript, and more. But in the year 2016, AWS (Amazon Web Service) acquired this tool and it turned into a chargeable system. 

Key Features:

Cloud 9 IDE, a web-based platform is used by software development companies for scripting and debugging the app code in the cloud.
It comes with various features like code completion suggestions, file dragging debugging, and more. 
With the use of Cloud 9, the developers can work with serverless applications.
Cloud 9 IDE is used by both web and mobile developers.
It enables one to create a replica of the entire software development environment. 
Developers who use AWS Cloud 9 can share the environment with team members. 

Dreamweaver

Adobe Dreamweaver, an exclusive software programming editor is used to develop both simple and complex websites. It supports languages like CSS, HTML, XML, and JavaScript.

Key Features:

Dreamweaver is used in different operating systems like Windows, iOS, and Linux.
The latest version of this tool can be sued by the developers for creating responsive websites.
Dreamweaver CS6 offers a preview option that enables one to have a look at the designed website.
Dreamweaver CC, another version of this tool is a combination of a code editor and a design surface. It comes with features like code collapsing, auto-completion of code, real-time syntax checking, code inspection, and syntax highlighting.

Bitbucket

Bitbucket, a web-based version control tool is used by the developers for collaboration between teams. It is utilized as a repository for the source code of projects.

Key Features:

Bitbucket is a powerful tool that comes with features like flexible deployment models, code collaboration on steroids, and unlimited private repositories.
With the use of Bitbucket, developers can organize the repositories into different projects.
Bitbucket supports a few services like issue tracking, code search, Git large file storage, integrations, bitbucket pipelines, smart mirroring, and more.

CodeLobster

CodeLobster is another popular software development tool that is free to use and is a very convenient PHP IDE. Developers use it to create fully-featured web applications. This tool supports technologies like HTML, Smarty, JavaScript, Twig, and CSS.

Key Features:

This PHP Debugger facilitates the developers in debugging the systems easily at the time of coding.
CodeLobster PHP Edition makes the development process easy by supporting CMS like Magneto, Joomla, Drupal, and WordPress.
Some of its best features are PHP Debugger, CSS code inspector, PHP Advanced autocomplete, auto-completing of keywords, and  DOM elements.
This tool offers file explorer features and browser previews.

Conclusion

As seen in this blog, there are many different types of software development tools available in the market. And all of them are robust, fully-featured, and widely used. Here, we have listed some of the most popularly used development tools that are used by developers for creating unique solutions for their clients. The choice between these tools might be difficult at first, but if the developer properly studies the project and its requirements, choosing the right software developer tool can be really easy. And it can help in creating the finest project.

The post Top Tools every Software Developer should know in 2022 appeared first on Flatlogic Blog.

373: Script Injection with Cloudflare Workers

This week Shaw and Chris dig into some deepnerd tech stuff: manipulating HTML. In a perfect world, perhaps we wouldn’t need to, but today, and even moreso in the foreseeable future of CodePen, we need to do a smidge of HTML manipulation on the HTML that you write or that is generated by code you write on CodePen. A tiny example is removing the autofocus attribute when a Pen in shown in a grid view <iframe>. A more significant example is that we need to inject some of our own JavaScript into your Pen, to power features of CodePen itself, like the console, which receives information from your rendered page (like logs, errors, etc) and can push commands to execute as well.

So how do we inject a <script> into absolutely 100% arbitrary HTML? Well, it’s tricky. We’re starting to do it with Cloudflare Workers and the HTMLRewriter stuff they can do. Even then, it’s not particularly easy, with lots of edge cases. Thank gosh for Miniflare for the ability to work on this stuff locally and write tests for it.

Time Jumps

00:22 Let’s talk Messing with HTML

03:07 Reasons for messing with HTML

05:48 How and when to inject a script

10:14 Where we show your profile page

14:17 Using Cloudflare workers

18:52 Testing

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Is React a Framework? Software Engineer Answering

By definition – React is one of the most popular JavaScript UI libraries nowadays. It comes in second place after jQuery among all web frameworks! React’s popularity has grown rapidly thanks to a simple and declarative API that allows you to build high-performance applications, and that momentum keeps growing. Still, there is often discussion and questioning that React is a framework or library.

Firstly, let’s look what the differents between framework and library? 

The framework belongs to the main() function. It executes some functions, e.g. controlling a collection of windows on the screen. The framework can, in principle, work even if you have not set it up in any way. It does something, e.g. it places an empty window with default widgets. The framework defines the general nature of the program, and your code provides a specific setting. These settings can be very significant, as both a word processor and a spreadsheet can be created using the same framework.

The library is the set of tools used by your code. Your code belongs to the main() and provides the overall structure of the program. A library performs some specific task, such as sending traffic over a network, drawing charts, or something else. The library can do big things, like draw a view of a three-dimensional space full of objects, but only after you tell it about those objects.

The framework can call your code, which in turn calls the library. But your code never calls the framework, except perhaps for system() or exec() functions.

But, is React a Framework? 

We asked our Software Engineers Team for their opinion and they were split into two parts: some maintain the view that React is a library, and others assign it as a Framework. Here are the most outstanding opinions:

From my point of view, React is not a framework, it’s just a library with no specific requirements for project structure. It’s about describing the abstractions of your application, logic, routing, data exchange, and so on. And React simplifies the work with this data, and optimizes the work with it

Anton M. – Software Engineer at Flatlogic.com

From my point of view, React is not a framework, it’s just a library with no specific requirements for project structure. It’s about describing the abstractions of your application, logic, routing, data exchange, and so on. And React simplifies the work with this data, and optimizes the work with it

I know that react calls itself a “library”, and a lot of developers prefer to react to the home page with the title “library”. However, I think that React is more like a framework now, with different targets like web, react native, etc. And the foundation of React is JSX, which is crucial for proper developer experience, and requires a build step, so you can’t just slap a bunch of JSX files into a browser and call it a day. Nowadays when you say “I built this app with React” you don’t mean that you used it on one page or as a modern jquery alternative. You mean that you built everything around react, with its ecosystem, its best practices, etc. And with all those points in mind, I’d rather call react the framework, than a library

Viktor S. – Staff Engineer at Flatlogic.com

We also conducted the research among others software engineers and would like to share with you the most impressive arguments on this point. 

So, is React a Framework or a Library?

React is a Library

React is a JavaScript library for building user interfaces. It is maintained by Facebook and a community of individual developers and companies. React can be used as a base in the development of single-page or mobile applications.

Now Why Library, not a Framework?

different definitions for library and framework:

a framework is a software where you plug your code into
a library is a software that you plug into your code

In terms of this definition, React is a framework. But some people, especially in the frontend world, say a framework has to bring stuff like routers and/or widgets, etc. 

So Angular, and ExtJS are frameworks, but React isn’t, because it only gives you the means to build components and render them into the DOM.

Let’s make it simple, in React we have to include packages for everything it’s not necessary but yes we can add them, thus React is a Library but if we are not given an option to do so with our code then that’s a framework like Angular and Vue.

React is a library because it’s only supposed to deal with the view part of the eco-system, and you can integrate it easily in any project you’re working on currently, it’s something like jQuery, it only helps you with organizing your views into reusable components, of course, the performance is one of the best things about React, especially with the new Fiber algorithm, things will be faster seeing the scheduler mechanism, unlike Angular, it’s a framework that gives you everything you need, most of the things are already built-in, for React you need to create your own/or grab some modules from npm to add extra functionality as need per your project.

It depends on how you use it. If you’re writing a small program and you structure your program around working with React, you are probably thinking of React as a framework.

If you have a big program and you use React as a small part of it just for handling output, then you’re probably thinking of React as a library.

If your program is 90% user interface, and not only your program structure but your data structures are shaped to fit the React system, then you may even think of React as a language. Hey, if TypeScript can be a language, why not React?

React is a library, cause it has mostly evolved into a vast ecosystem that is barely distinguishable from a framework. A framework protects the edges, whereas a library provides a tool for doing certain tasks. React handles exactly one task: abstracted Web Components. It offers an internal state, lifecycles, and external properties, as well as a renderer for a browser or comparable environment through ReactDOM – and nothing more.

This has a few advantages: it is smaller than a full-featured framework, has fewer opinions on how to address problems, and so provides more options.

I’d say React is a library posing as a framework. It feels like working in a framework (esp. with JSX, though using that is optional), but under the hood, it is just a library. This definition is quite good:

a framework is software that you plug your code into (e.g. you work “inside” it).
a library is software that you plug into your code (e.g. you “hand-off” certain tasks to it, or build “on top” of it).

React feels like the first, but is the second. The attached video compares React and Angular and hints at the distinction. Since React treats your code as a black box, you can push the data-binding concerns out to the edges of your system, to be “handed off” to React (i.e. how you would use a library). Angular, on the other hand, forces you to work “inside” their “scopes” using their “directives” to handle data-binding. In Angular, you are passing your data through scopes that observe your data model. You are always at the mercy of whichever directives they are building into their framework scaffolding. You are also working “inside” HTML (JS-in-HTML), with all the constraints that impose (giving more of a framework feeling). But with React, you have less of that feeling, since you have freedom (full power of JS), and can build “on top” of React (HTML/JSX-in-JS). This is good since JS is inherently more powerful than HTML.

React is a Framework

React is a framework. Honestly caring about the difference between a library and a framework is a bit pedantic, so I’d say you can call it either. Having said that, my definitions of the two words are that a library is a collection of functions, and a framework is a way of doing things.

By this definition, React is a framework because it forces you to build UI in the React way instead of the Angular, etc. On the other hand, the dash is a perfect example of a library because it’s just a collection of functions, use them however you want.

JavaScript is known for its abundance of new plugins, frameworks, and other things created by its massive community of developers and designers.

You must be wondering what this fact has to do with the React JS framework and other frameworks. The truth is that many of the leading IT firms have already embraced JavaScript and leveraged its benefits.

That should answer the question and not cause any other debates, right? Well, not exactly; the debate over Is React a framework or library? is as strong as ever.

Over the years, developers, software engineers, and developer communities came up with pros and cons related to the status of React as a library or React as a framework. Let’s analyze them together.

React as a library

React can be easily swapped by some other javascript library offering similar functionalities.
React can be easily plugged into an existing technology stack – and that’s the definition of a library.

React as a framework

Related libraries must work in an opinionated way.
Because of its state and lifecycle on the components, you inverted the control to React.

Are you asking why React was designed as a library and not a framework [1] or why it is classified as a library and not a framework [2]?

[1] Why it was built that way. A library is something you can add to an existing project to enhance it. It does not impose any restrictions or conventions on your application design and you can supplement it with other libraries of your choice to flesh out your application. There is also a shorter learning curve (usually) on a library as you can add it incrementally to your project. A framework on the other hand implies structure and convention, you need to follow the conventions of the framework. In many cases a framework limits you to working within these conventions – you cannot (or it is difficult) to mix a framework with other code.

There are use cases for each.

[2] Why it is not classified as a framework. Based on the definition of a framework it does not fit the bill – it is a library that is added to your code – it does not impose structure – beyond the use of the library itself and it can be mixed in with other code.

React does not solve any structural or architectural problems on the app level. It provides us with a set of methods for better (in my opinion) handling of the front-end. I remember when jQuery did that back in the day, and how that started the revolution… React is now doing the same, just better.

Because React is a library eventually we got Flux and Redux. Both of them are handling real-world problems that come alongside Scaling. Mare library does not think about that.

React is a framework because Redux is referencing it as one (Source). Ah, as I started to hope that something in life is going to be easy. With React and Redux there is a clear layer of separation between the view and data. That is why React is not a complete framework to solve the entire problem.

Conclusion

Soft engineers spend a lot of time talking about what React is. The answer is important for any React soft engineer, no matter their skill level. That is because it indicates what they should know and how they should work when developing any React application. Depending on who you are, a beginner or an advanced React soft engineer, I hope this thoughtful research will improve your development process as you build your next React project.

The post Is React a Framework? Software Engineer Answering appeared first on Flatlogic Blog.

Creating full-stack web applications based on database schema for free!

Today, we’re excited to announce the free pricing plan for our CRUD tool. That means that more customers than ever before can use Flatlogic for creating a proper CRUD React/Vue/Angular web application based on the database schema.

What can you do with the free plan for the CRUD tool

You can expect the same features and functionality whether you choose our Paid access or Free option. But obviously with some limitations:

Create up to 10 applications on different technology stacks: React, Vue, Angular, Node.js, Laravel, PostgreSQL, MySQL
Create a full-fledged CRUD application (up to 3 database entities) with code written using best practices
Download or push source code to Github an unlimited number of times
Preview the code before downloading/pushing it on Github
Get updates on libraries used in your app stack
Host instantly your application demo and see the latest deployment logs

Free vs Paid access to the CRUD tool: Choose what you need

Since launching Flatlogic, we see constant growth in the creation of CRUD applications. But we understand that not all of our users need the full functionality of the CRUD tool. We also understand that in the modern world of developer tools, before investing huge resources in mastering new tools, you want to get some value here and now for free – with this motivation we introducing a free plan for creating CRUD applications.

Thus the free plan fits your needs. If you:

Want quickly prototype the CRUD app

Want to test or get familiar with new technologies before investing much time in them
See the best practice on how to organize modern CRUD apps using best practices
Prefer to use starter kits/boilerplates while starting CRUD web applications

And while our Professional plan has always offered a more enhanced way to create CRUD applications, it also required additional steps to understand your needs before getting access.

Now, you can sign up for a free account for a CRUD tool, create applications in minutes, and understand without any hassle whether Flatlogic fits your needs or not.

Create a CRUD app for free!

The post Creating full-stack web applications based on database schema for free! appeared first on Flatlogic Blog.

Starting a Web App in 2022 [Research Results]

We are finally happy to share with you the results of the world’s first study on how developers start a web application in 2022. For this research, we wanted to do a deep dive into how engineers around the globe are starting web apps, how popular the use of low-code platforms and what tools are decisive in creating web applications.

To achieve this, we conducted a survey with 191 software engineers of all experience around the globe. We asked questions around the technology they use to start web applications.

Highlights of the key findings:

The usage of particular technologies in the creation of web apps is closely related to engineers’ experience. New technologies, such as no-code/low-code solutions, GraphQL, and non-relational databases, appeal to developers with less expertise;

Engineers with less experience are more likely to learn from online sources, whereas developers with more expertise in software development prefer to learn from more conventional sources such as books;

Retool and Bubble are the most popular no-code/low-code platforms;

React, Node.js, PostgreSQL, Amazon AWS, and Bootstrap are the most popular web application development stacks.

To read the full report, including additional insights, and full research methodology, visit this page

With Flatlogic you can create full-stack web applications literally in minutes. If you’re interested in trying Flatlogic solutions, sign up for free

The post Starting a Web App in 2022 [Research Results] appeared first on Flatlogic Blog.

372: Trends

This week Marie and Chris get together to chat about what’s been hot hot hot on CodePen lately. We’ve discovered there is a really taking to the creamy cardstock look, for one thing. Typography is always great, but we’re seeing more typographic trickery often including variable fonts. While not new, there are still loads of really wonderfully creative Pens using Three.js and p5.js. Neon-on-dark is a fresh look. We get into those and more, a bit sneakily as we can take an internal look at what the Top 100 might look like this year, but we can’t share those details too early!

Time Jumps

00:24 Trending episode

01:34 The web3 aesthetic

03:33 Pen and ink on cardstock

06:44 Variable fonts

10:18 Ask the database what’s popping?

11:42 Celebrating follower number

12:49 ThreeJS and P5 processing

20:08 Public documentation on what it takes to get picked

26:33 CodePen Challenges

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React Labs: What We’ve Been Working On – June 2022

React 18 was years in the making, and with it brought valuable lessons for the React team. Its release was the result of many years of research and exploring many paths. Some of those paths were successful; many more were dead-ends that led to new insights. One lesson we’ve learned is that it’s frustrating for the community to wait for new features without having insight into these paths that we’re exploring.

We typically have a number of projects being worked on at any time, ranging from the more experimental to the clearly defined. Looking ahead, we’d like to start regularly sharing more about what we’ve been working on with the community across these projects.

To set expectations, this is not a roadmap with clear timelines. Many of these projects are under active research and are difficult to put concrete ship dates on. They may possibly never even ship in their current iteration depending on what we learn. Instead, we want to share with you the problem spaces we’re actively thinking about, and what we’ve learned so far.

Server Components

We announced an experimental demo of React Server Components (RSC) in December 2020. Since then we’ve been finishing up its dependencies in React 18, and working on changes inspired by experimental feedback.

In particular, we’re abandoning the idea of having forked I/O libraries (eg react-fetch), and instead adopting an async/await model for better compatibility. This doesn’t technically block RSC’s release because you can also use routers for data fetching. Another change is that we’re also moving away from the file extension approach in favor of annotating boundaries.

We’re working together with Vercel and Shopify to unify bundler support for shared semantics in both Webpack and Vite. Before launch, we want to make sure that the semantics of RSCs are the same across the whole React ecosystem. This is the major blocker for reaching stable.

Asset Loading

Currently, assets like scripts, external styles, fonts, and images are typically preloaded and loaded using external systems. This can make it tricky to coordinate across new environments like streaming, server components, and more.
We’re looking at adding APIs to preload and load deduplicated external assets through React APIs that work in all React environments.

We’re also looking at having these support Suspense so you can have images, CSS, and fonts that block display until they’re loaded but don’t block streaming and concurrent rendering. This can help avoid “popcorning“ as the visuals pop and layout shifts.

Static Server Rendering Optimizations

Static Site Generation (SSG) and Incremental Static Regeneration (ISR) are great ways to get performance for cacheable pages, but we think we can add features to improve performance of dynamic Server Side Rendering (SSR) – especially when most but not all of the content is cacheable. We’re exploring ways to optimize server rendering utilizing compilation and static passes.

React Optimizing Compiler

We gave an early preview of React Forget at React Conf 2021. It’s a compiler that automatically generates the equivalent of useMemo and useCallback calls to minimize the cost of re-rendering, while retaining React’s programming model.

Recently, we finished a rewrite of the compiler to make it more reliable and capable. This new architecture allows us to analyze and memoize more complex patterns such as the use of local mutations, and opens up many new compile-time optimization opportunities beyond just being on par with memoization hooks.

We’re also working on a playground for exploring many aspects of the compiler. While the goal of the playground is to make development of the compiler easier, we think that it will make it easier to try it out and build intuition for what the compiler does. It reveals various insights into how it works under the hood, and live renders the compiler’s outputs as you type. This will be shipped together with the compiler when it’s released.

Offscreen

Today, if you want to hide and show a component, you have two options. One is to add or remove it from the tree completely. The problem with this approach is that the state of your UI is lost each time you unmount, including state stored in the DOM, like scroll position.

The other option is to keep the component mounted and toggle the appearance visually using CSS. This preserves the state of your UI, but it comes at a performance cost, because React must keep rendering the hidden component and all of its children whenever it receives new updates.

Offscreen introduces a third option: hide the UI visually, but deprioritize its content. The idea is similar in spirit to the content-visibility CSS property: when content is hidden, it doesn’t need to stay in sync with the rest of the UI. React can defer the rendering work until the rest of the app is idle, or until the content becomes visible again.

Offscreen is a low level capability that unlocks high level features. Similar to React’s other concurrent features like startTransition, in most cases you won’t interact with the Offscreen API directly, but instead via an opinionated framework to implement patterns like:

Instant transitions. Some routing frameworks already prefetch data to speed up subsequent navigations, like when hovering over a link. With Offscreen, they’ll also be able to prerender the next screen in the background.

Reusable state. Similarly, when navigating between routes or tabs, you can use Offscreen to preserve the state of the previous screen so you can switch back and pick up where you left off.

Virtualized list rendering. When displaying large lists of items, virtualized list frameworks will prerender more rows than are currently visible. You can use Offscreen to prerender the hidden rows at a lower priority than the visible items in the list.

Backgrounded content. We’re also exploring a related feature for deprioritizing content in the background without hiding it, like when displaying a modal overlay.

Transition Tracing

Currently, React has two profiling tools. The original Profiler shows an overview of all the commits in a profiling session. For each commit, it also shows all components that rendered and the amount of time it took for them to render. We also have a beta version of a Timeline Profiler introduced in React 18 that shows when components schedule updates and when React works on these updates. Both of these profilers help developers identify performance problems in their code.

We’ve realized that developers don’t find knowing about individual slow commits or components out of context that useful. It’s more useful to know about what actually causes the slow commits. And that developers want to be able to track specific interactions (eg a button click, an initial load, or a page navigation) to watch for performance regressions and to understand why an interaction was slow and how to fix it.

We previously tried to solve this issue by creating an Interaction Tracing API, but it had some fundamental design flaws that reduced the accuracy of tracking why an interaction was slow and sometimes resulted in interactions never ending. We ended up removing this API because of these issues.

We are working on a new version for the Interaction Tracing API (tentatively called Transition Tracing because it is initiated via startTransition) that solves these problems.

New React Docs

Last year, we announced the beta version of the new React documentation website. The new learning materials teach Hooks first and has new diagrams, illustrations, as well as many interactive examples and challenges. We took a break from that work to focus on the React 18 release, but now that React 18 is out, we’re actively working to finish and ship the new documentation.

We are currently writing a detailed section about effects, as we’ve heard that is one of the more challenging topics for both new and experienced React users. Synchronizing with Effects is the first published page in the series, and there are more to come in the following weeks. When we first started writing a detailed section about effects, we’ve realized that many common effect patterns can be simplified by adding a new primitive to React. We’ve shared some initial thoughts on that in the useEvent RFC. It is currently in early research, and we are still iterating on the idea. We appreciate the community’s comments on the RFC so far, as well as the feedback and contributions to the ongoing documentation rewrite. We’d specifically like to thank Harish Kumar for submitting and reviewing many improvements to the new website implementation.

Thanks to Sophie Alpert for reviewing this blog post!

12+ Best Node.js Frameworks for Web App Development in 2022

Node.js is getting increasingly popular among developers, to the point where some developers call Node.js their primary choice for backend development. In this article, we review the 12 best Node.js web frameworks that we rate according to their popularity and unique toolkits for time and cost-efficiency.

Is Node.js a web framework?

So is Node.js a web framework? The most common way of referring to it is as a web framework. Still, Node.js is a JavaScript execution environment – a server-side platform for JavaScript code execution and portability. Instead, web frameworks focus on building features. A lot of developers have built Node.js web frameworks, such as Nest.js, Express.js, and other toolkits, for Node.js applications, providing a unique experience for software developers.

What are Node.js web frameworks?

Every web application technology offers different types of frameworks, all supporting a specific use case in the development lifecycle. Node.js web frameworks come in three types – Full-Stack Model-View-Controller (MVC), MVC, and REST API web frameworks.

Node.js web framework features

API of Node.js is asynchronous. You can use the Node.js server to move after a data request, rather than waiting for the API to return the information.
The code execution process of Node.js is faster compared to the reverse backend framework.
Node.js runs on a single-threaded model.
With Node.js web framework developers never face buffering issues because it transfers information by parts.
It is supported by Google’s Node.js runtime environment.

Through these features, it is clear to understand why developers more often choose Node.js for Backend development. Let’s take a closer look at each Node.js web framework.

NestJS

Github repo: https://github.com/nestjs/nest
License: MIT
Github stars: 47400

NestJS is object-oriented and functional-reactive programming (FRP), widely used for developing enterprise-level dynamic and scalable web solutions, being well featured with extensive libraries.

NestJS is based on TypeScript as its core programming language, but is also highly compatible with a JavaScript subset and easily integrated with other frameworks such as ExpressJS through a command-line interface.

Why use NestJS:

Modern CLI 
 functional-reactive programming
Multiple easy-to-use external libraries
Straightforward Angular compatibility

NestJS has a clean and modular architecture pattern aiding developers to build scalable and maintainable applications with ease. 

Pros of NestJS:

Powerful but super friendly to work with
Fast development
Easy to understand documentation
Angular style syntax for the backend

NodeJS ecosystem
Typescript
Its easy to understand since it follows angular syntax
Good architecture
Integrates with Narwhal Extensions
Typescript makes it well integrated in vscode
Graphql support easy
Agnosticism
Easily integrate with others external extensions

ExpressJS

Github repo: https://github.com/expressjs/express
License: MIT
Github stars: 57200

ExpressJS is minimalistic, asynchronous, fast, and powerful and was launched in 2010. It’s beginner-friendly thanks to a low learning curve that requires only a basic understanding of the Node.js environment and programming skills. ExpressJS optimises client-to-server requests and observed user interaction via an API very quickly, and also helps you manage high-speed I/O operations. 

Why use ExpressJS:

Enhanced content coordination
MVC architecture pattern
HTTP helpers
Asynchronous programming to support multiple independent operations

ExpressJS offers templating, robust routing, security and error handling, making it suitable for building enterprise or browser-based applications.

Pros of ExpressJS :

Simple
NodeJS
Javascript
High performance
Robust routing
Middlewares
Open source
Great community
Hybrid web applications
Well documented
Light weight

Meteor

Github repo: https://github.com/meteor/meteor
License: MIT
Github stars: 42900

Meteor is an open-source framework that was launched in 2012 that works best for teams who want to develop in a single language, being a full-featured Node.js web framework. Meteor is ideal for modern real-time applications as it facilitates instant data transfer between server and client.

Why use Meteor:

Cross-platform web framework
Rapid prototyping using the CLI
Extensive community support and open-source code
End-to-end solution 
Seamless integration with other frameworks

The Meteor is an excellent option for those who are familiar with Javascript and prefer it. It’s a great one for both web and mobile app development as well. Meteor is great for applications that require a lot of updates that need to be sent out, even in a live environment.

Pros of Meteor :

Real-time
Full stack, one language
Best app dev platform available today
Data synchronization
Javascript
Focus on your product not the plumbing
Hot code pushes
Open source
Live page updates
Latency compensation
Ultra-simple development environment
Great for beginners
Smart Packages

KoaJS

Github repo: https://github.com/koajs/koa
License: MIT
Github stars: 32700

Koa has been called the next-generation Node.js web framework, and it’s one of the best of the bunch. Koa uses a stack-based approach to handling HTTP mediators, which makes it a great option for easy API development. Koa is similar to ExpressJS, so it’s fairly easy to switch from either one. Despite the same features and flexibility, Koa reduces the complexity of writing code even more.  

Why use Koa:

Multi-level customisation
Considered a lightweight version of ExpressJS
Supplied with cascading middleware ( user experience personalisation)
Node mismatch normalization 
Cleans caches and supports content and proxy negotiation

Use Koa when performance is the main focus of your web application. Koa is ahead of ExpressJS in some scenarios, so you can use it for large-scale projects. 

Pros of Koa :

Async/Await
JavaScript
REST API

socket.io

Github repo:https://github.com/socketio/socket.io
License: MIT
Github stars: 55900

The socket is a Javascript library that works most effectively for real-time web applications. The socket is used when communication between real-time web clients and servers needs to be efficiently bidirectional. 

Why use socket.io:

Binary support 
Multiplexing support
Reliability
Auto-reconnection support
Auto-correction and error detection 

The socket is a great choice when building real-time applications like video conferencing, chat rooms and multiplayer games with servers being required to send data out before it’s requested from the client-side.

Pros of socket :

Real-time
Event-based communication
NodeJS
WebSockets
Open source
Binary streaming
No internet dependency
Large community

TotalJS

Github repo: https://github.com/totaljs/
License: MIT
Github stars: n/a

TotalJS is a web framework that offers a CMS-like user experience and has almost all the functionality you need in a Node.js environment. The framework is a full open-source framework that provides developers with the ultimate flexibility. There are various options available for the framework, e.g. CMS, and HelpDesk. Through these options, your application will have more integration possibilities with the REST service and hyper-fast, low-maintenance, stable applications. 

TotalJS is most well-known for its real-time, high-precision tracking in modern applications. 

Pros of TotalJS:

Tracking in real-time
API Testing
Automatic project discovery
Compatibility with multiple databases
Flexibility to work with different frontend frameworks
Fast development and low cost of maintenance

SailsJS

Github repo: https://github.com/balderdashy/sails
License: MIT
Github stars: 22247

SailsJS is similar to the MVC architect pattern of web frameworks such as Ruby on Rails, and it supports modernized data-centric development. Compatible with all databases, at the same time it flexibly integrates Javascript frameworks. SailsJS is the most relevant framework for building high-quality custom applications. Its special code-writing policy helps reduce the code needed, allowing you to integrate npm modules while remaining flexible and open source. 

Pros of SailsJS:

REST API auto-generation
Multiple security policies
Frontend agnosticism
Object Relational Mapping for framework databases compatibility
Supports ExpressJS integration for HTTP requests and socket.io for WebSockets 

FeathersJS

Github repo: https://github.com/feathersjs/feathers
License: MIT
Github stars: 14000

FeathersJS is gaining popularity between website and application developers because it provides flexibility in development with react native as well as Node.js. It is a framework of microservices because it operates with more than one database, providing real-time functionality. FeathersJS makes it easier for web developers to code concretely and understandably.

Pros of FeathersJS:

Reusable services
Modern CLI 
Automated RESTful APIs
Authentication and authorization plugins by default
Lightweight

FeathersJS natively supports all frontend technologies, and its database-agnostic is best performed in a Node.js environment because the web framework supports Javascript and Typescript. It allows you to create production-ready applications and real-time applications, and also REST APIs in just a few days.

hapi.dev

Github repo: https://github.com/hapijs/hapi
License: MIT
Github stars: 13900

Hapi is an open-source framework for web applications. It is well-known for proxy server development as well as REST APIs and some other desktop applications since the framework is robust and security-rich. It has a wealth of built-in plugins, therefore this means you don’t have to worry about running non-official middleware. 

Pros of Hapi:

Extensive and scalable applications
Low overhead
Secure default settings
Rich ecosystem
Quick and easy bug fixes
Compatible with multiple databases
Compatible with Rest API and HTTPS proxy applications
Caching, authentication and input validation by default

AdonisJS

Github repo: https://github.com/adonisjs/core
License: MIT
Github stars: 12600

AdonisJS is a Model-View-Controller Node.js web framework based on a structural template repeating Laravel. The framework decreases the time required for development by focusing on core details such as out of the box web socket support, development speed and performance, lifecycle dependency management, and built-in modules for data validation, mailing, and authentication. Command-based coding structure and the interface is easy for developers to understand. The Node.js web framework uses the concepts of dependency injections through IoC or control inversion. It offers developers an organized structure for accessing all the components of the framework. 

Pros of AdonisJS:

Organised template with folder structure
Easy user input validation. 
Ability to write custom functional testing scripts
Support for Lucid object-relational mapping.
Threat protection such as cross-site forgery protection

Loopback

Github repo: https://github.com/loopbackio/loopback-next
License: MIT
Github stars: 4200

Loopback provides the best connection with any Node.js web framework and can be integrated with multiple API services. You can best use the platform to build REST APIs with minimal lead time. Loopback offers outstanding flexibility, interfacing with a broad range of browsers, devices,  databases, and services. Framework’s structured code helps support application modules and speed of development. Loopback has the best documentation, allowing even beginners to work with it. 

Pros of Loopback:

Comprehensive support for networked applications
The built-in client API explorer
High extensibility
Multiple database support
Clean and modular code
Full-stack development
Data storage, third-party access, and user management

Loopback is designed solely for creating powerful end-to-end APIs and handling requests for them. 

DerbyJS

Github repo: https://github.com/derbyjs/derby
License: MIT
Github stars: 4622

DerbyJS is a full-stack web application development platform powered by Node.js technology. This framework uses the Model-View-Controller architecture with an easy-to-write nomenclature for coding. This framework is great for building real-time web applications since it allows essentially the same code to work on Node.js and in the browser. That way, you don’t have to worry about writing separate codes for the view part. DerbyJS decreases the delay in content delivery by rendering a client-side view on the server. Performing this makes the application SEO-friendly and improves the user experience. 

Pros of DerbyJS:

Support for Racer Engine
Real-time conversion for data synchronization
Offline use and conflict resolution support

Version control 
Client-side and server-side code sharing
Rendering client-side views on the server-side

Conclusion

Node.js web frameworks make application development easier with their enormous possibilities for the advancement of web and mobile application development.  Under the conditions of increasingly growing technologies, a thorough investigation of project requirements and accessibility of resources is the key to choosing the right web framework that will provide the greatest results.

The post 12+ Best Node.js Frameworks for Web App Development in 2022 appeared first on Flatlogic Blog.

Javascript Clean Code Principles

One of the books that has most influenced my life is The Elements of Style by Strunk and White. I took a technical writing class in college where we closely studied its recommendations. The book is short and contains over 100 side-by-side comparisons of less effective and more effective writing.

Reading it made me realize that I learn well by example and comparison. I’ve long wanted to write an article that shows less effective and more effective programming approaches by comparison for those who also learn well by comparison.

Today I’m going to lay out what I’ve found to be the most important principles for writing clean code. In the first section, the examples are written in JavaScript, but they apply to almost every language. In the second section, the examples are specific to React.

Before we start the side-by-side comparisons, I want to make a recommendation that needs no side-by-side view.

Use prettier

If you have not heard of it, prettier is an automated code formatting tool. The idea is that you add a prettier config file to your project, and request all your teammates or contributors to enable an IDE plugin that re-formats code on save.

Never again will my team have an argument about tabs vs spaces or 80-column wrap vs 120-column wrap. It will also settle disputes about what types of quotes to use, whether to use semicolons or what spacing to use around brackets.

Prettier was created for JavaScript, JSX, and JSON, but it has plugins for HTML, CSS, md, XML, YAML, toml, PHP, python, ruby, java, shell and many more

My favorite thing is that I concentrate on code and not on formatting. I can quickly add code without proper newlines or spacing and then watch prettier magically format the new code.

Let’s start

Each recommendation below has a very short description and a code example so you can compare more effective vs. less-effective approaches.

Exit early when possible

When writing a function, consider the negative outcomes that would allow you to exit early from the function. You’ll find your code has fewer indentations and is easier to read.

Be expressive, not clever

Of the two functions below, which would you rather come across in a project? Maybe the first one is clever and concise, but how much time does it take you to tweak the functionality?

Make variable names descriptive

When you write code, you may have only one thing on your mind. But when you come back later to look at code, descriptive variable names are very helpful.

Prefer for-of loops

for-of loops have some advantages over for-i, forEach and for-in loops:

Fewer characters
Ability to continue, return or break from the loop
Easier to read and follow

Prefix booleans with verbs such as “is” and “has”

Verbs help set a boolean apart from other types.

Avoid double negatives.

Sometimes they’re subtle and lead to cheeky bugs.

Avoid using “!” with “else”

Instead, use the positive form in the if condition.

Prefer string interpolation over concatenation

It’s almost always more readable to interpolate.

Avoid using the ternary operator to a return boolean value

In return statements, ternary operators are redundant.

Use try-catch with await

async await makes code more readable than a tree of .then() calls. But don’t forget that you need to catch rejections that await-ed values might throw.

Avoid using “magic” numbers

Any number or string that has a non-obvious meaning should be declared as a separate, descriptively named variable.

Avoid declaring functions with more than 2 arguments

Arguments should have a logical order. When you have 3 or more arguments, the order is often not obvious. Yes, we have intellisense in our IDE, but save some thought cycles by accepting “named” arguments if appropriate.

Prefer objects to boolean arguments

Code that calls the function will be cleaner and more obvious.

A Section on React

JSX and React have their own challenges that deserve some extra attention.

Declare DOM only once per function

You can take one of three approaches to avoid it:

Break components into smaller units
Use && as a stand-in for if blocks
Use the ternary operator for if-else blocks

Make your own wrappers on top of UI libraries

Your project might rely on MUI or another UI library for all it’s components. But keeping your UI consistent can be challenging if you have to remember sizes, colors and variants. In the example below, the project wants to always use medium outlined buttons in MUI.

Mind the guard operator

In Javascript, && is the guard operator not a boolean operator; it returns the first operand that is truthy.

A final word

Writing clean code takes practice. Be a code craftsman and take the time to learn good principles and make good habits.

The post Javascript Clean Code Principles appeared first on Flatlogic Blog.

Angular Material Admin Template Update

Angular Material Admin is updated and use latest dependencies.

What products are affected by the update?

Currently, the updates were released on 2 products:

Angular Material Admin Template Full
Angular Material Admin .NET Core

What has changed?

The main update is touch the version of Angular itself, now the template are built on 13 version instead of 11.

And also we made several minor changes that make this admin dashboard template up-to-date.

Updated the Angular CLI to 13
Update Angular Material;
Updated different packages;
Updated Angular Core to 13 version.

Moving forward and Summing Up

We will be constantly updating all our Angular templates. For sure we will release this year a template based on Angular 14.

Rest of our Angular templates your can find here: Flatlogic marketplace. If you face any difficulties setting up this or that template or admin dashboard, please feel free to leave us a message on our forumTwitter or Facebook. We will respond to your inquiry as quickly as possible!

And also check our platform where you can create Angular CRUD apps literally in minutes! 

Happy developing!

The post Angular Material Admin Template Update appeared first on Flatlogic Blog.